The Paris Convention has nothing to do with wine, cheese or even prisoners of war.  It's about protecting intellectual property in foreign countries. For Australians, the Paris Convention means that it is possible to apply for registration of your trade mark overseas after the first application (usually...

  Australians are becoming increasingly sophisticated about intellectual property.  It's great to see traders registering their business names (because the government says they have to) and registering those business names as trade marks (because that's the only way they have proprietary rights to the business name). The...

Today's post is by Geraldine Rimmer ([email protected])  who, I'm very pleased to announce, has recently joined us here at Michael Buck IP and who is a specialist trade mark practitioner.  Angie recently helped a client deal with a person who was systematically copying the client's product. Imagine the shock you’d experience if you discovered that every aspect of you product’s packaging – the artwork, the product name, your name, the bar code and the place of manufacture – was being copied without your knowledge. Imagine the distress you’d further experience when you discover that many of your existing clients were purchasing the counterfeit product thinking you were the manufacturer. After you’d recovered from the initial shock, you’d want the manufacture and sale of the counterfeit product – a product which was cheaper and of poorer quality than yours – to stop.  But how?
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